Tuesday, February 24, 2015

These are the most educated neighborhoods in Charlotte

If you live close to Freedom Park, there's a one-in-three chance you have a graduate degree.

The folks at research firm FindTheBest crunched some federal data to determine the areas of Charlotte with the highest percentage of people with graduate degrees. Here's what they found.


Charlotte, North Carolina

FindTheHome

The area of south Charlotte just north of Pineville-Matthews Road has a strong showing in the numbers. The trendy Plaza Midwood and Chantilly areas are also up there.

Overall (and unsurprisingly, given it's a metro area) Mecklenburg County has a larger percentage of people with a graduate degree than the state and country as a whole. Meck clocks in at 12.9 percent, compared with 9.3 percent for North Carolina and 10.8 for the U.S.

17 comments:

Anonymous said...

This map is hard to use due to not giving street names and naming neighborhood groupings that differ from what I recognize. When I clicked my neighborhood area, the map that came up was an area a mile away which is actually Country Club Heights. When I looked up Country Club Heights, it gave a map over by Central Ave not near Country Club Heights. This gives me doubt about the accuracy of the information provided.

Anonymous said...

Today the DEBT is not worth the DEGREE

Anonymous said...

come on now. they pass out masters like candy today as long as you got the dough notwithstanding teachers with masters or multiple masters have been outed as poor performers in many cases so the raises stopped as you know. simple college degree teachers out perform much better.
than again all the big money 150k administrative slots require a masters plus a certain shade.
the token white boy super slot though on the bubble after major recent school board and attorney scandals. jury still out on that one.

Yamo said...

Although I question the data and how they "crunched" the numbers, I grew up around Freedom and am almost finished with my $23K graduate degree. From an experiential and learning standpoint, Freedom Park was a paradise within which I grew up and have lived for many years. The security of that time and freedom of movement with low traffic from the 1970s through the 1990s made that area a great place to learn, grow, and experience many opporunties for community. In my case, when all my friends had a dignity of learning and strove for excellence, you followed right along. The environment there had a lot to do with it. Just a thought.

Anonymous said...

A.Dunn, when and where was the CMS bus accident today?

Andrew Dunn said...

The bus accident was at about 8:30 a.m. near the 4100 block of McIntyre Avenue. See details here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2015/02/24/5535053/snow-falling-in-charlotte-tuesday.html#.VOz21fnF9AI

Shamash said...

Anon 4:38pm.

"This map is hard to use due to not giving street names and naming neighborhood groupings that differ from what I recognize. "

You could probably use the crime map or the political party voting maps from the last major election.

All show about the same general pattern.

Larry said...

So what have we learned from this information.

The relationship between those who embrace education, and the schools in the area in which they live, have an apparent correlation.

Perhaps instead of a Political Action Committee at almost every Church in the Red Zones on this map, they might want to have an Educational Committee working hard with the local schools and youth.

Anonymous said...

If only education and intelligence went hand in hand.

Anonymous said...

Larry,

"The relationship between those who embrace education, and the schools in the area in which they live, have an apparent correlation."

This is why I don't care for how our state evaluates schools, whether charter or not. Children are a reflection of the home in which they are raised and yet this is virtually ignored when evaluating schools. When schools struggle, we are quick to blame the schools but say practically nothing about the responsibility of the children and the parents!

Wiley Coyote said...

Dunn,

When is CMS going to release demographic data for 2014/2015?

Anonymous said...

what about just a college degree? doing this on a grad degree is overboard and stupid.

Larry said...

8:57 Do not let the schools off in this whole matter.

The only adult in the room is the school system, they control the money and can control the elected officials.

If I ever once see an effort from the schools where they are cracking down on the parents and getting off the PC track, then I would go back to volunteering at them.

But for now, all they exist for is one thing, to increase and get more tax money. The education part is just a blip on their screens.

I want to see us deconsolidate our system and make it into three system which will serve the STUDENTS in the areas which they live.

IBM and others have seen that bigger is not better anymore.

Charter Schools are a sterling example of focusing on the kids and their education.

So get Andrew to do a story on getting our schools Deconsolidated. www.Deconsolidated.com

Pamela Grundy said...

Finally Larry gives a shoutout to Shamrock Gardens! When people from many different backgrounds who care about their children work together, great things can indeed happen.

Anonymous said...

Not sure I see the relevance of this article to CMS schools. Families such as these typically send their kids to expensive private schools.

Anonymous said...

"When people from many different backgrounds who care about their children work together, great things can indeed happen".

Larry,

Pamela's statement is correct. Educational outcomes are ALL about adults in a child's life who care and value schooling.


"Charter Schools are a sterling example of focusing on the kids and their education".

I completely disagree with your statement. I teach 5th grade at a rural public charter school that received a "C" from the state. My network of public charter schools received grades that ranged from an A to a D. From what I can gather, NC public charter schools performed generally the same as their 'apple-to-apple' traditional public school counterparts (on a lot less money and with far fewer resources). Although my school isn't racially diverse, it is economically diverse - to an extreme that rarely exists in CMS. And let me assure you, every child at my "Choice" C charter school has at least one adult in their life who "cares" about their education - be it a biological parent, step parent or foster parent.

Words can not express the disappointment and thorough disgust I feel towards our state based on this latest letter grade 'School Reform' legislation. Failed 'No Child Left Behind' mandates produced less harm than NC's latest humiliation to teachers, parents and anyone else who cares about education beyond meeting the selfish needs of their own children.

And what did NC's letter grades accomplish in the long run other than punishing schools and embarrassingly underpaid teachers on the frontline trying to make a difference?

Shame on NC.

Alicia

Wiley Coyote said...

Alicia,

Public education is infested with bad programs and decisions today as it was decades ago.

Nothing has changed.

You can take away all the letter grades you want, but the fact is, schools are still underperforming in most cases and the "use growth" argument is as laughable as the letter grade.